DISD Trustee Morath Speaks with Forked Tongue

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morath-forked-tongueYou won’t see this headline in the DMN, but this incident from the recent DISD Board of Trustees meeting deserves to be exposed on the front page:

DISD Trustee Mike Morath casts the lone vote against the First Amendment rights of DISD employees, voting against provisions spelled out in the Texas Education Code.

 The April 25, 2013 Board meeting started out innocently enough. The public was treated to an inspirational moment delivered by Trustee Mike Morath.  Mr. Morath extolled the virtues of the DISD teachers in lofty terms, saying “Teaching as a profession is just about the highest calling of man.”  He went on to equate the job of teaching with that of a neurosurgeon.  He stated that, “This is a job that requires cognitive skill of the absolute highest order… and we have about 11,000 teachers that execute this with rigor and patience.”  He ended his silvery speech by saying, “I just wanted to say ‘thank you’ to all of our teachers for your valiant work.  You fight like lions and you will be rewarded in heaven.”

Who could possibly not be happy with that? It’s not every day that a sitting trustee speaks so highly of all 11,000 teachers in DISD.

For those who stayed for the entire meeting, it soon became crystal clear just why Trustee Morath figured he’d better have something on tape which would make for good sound bites in order  to offset his upcoming vote against the civil rights of all DISD employees.

DISD employees, especially teachers, have long been afraid to speak to the trustees about issues occurring at their schools for fear that the administration would retaliate.  In September 2012, Mike Miles issued a memo directed at principals in order to prevent them from freely speaking to trustees as well.

The memo stated:  “…it is an expectation for principals, executives, Core Team members, and Cabinet members to let their supervisor know when they have a conversation with a Trustee regarding a significant concern or interest of the District that  should be addressed by a decision of the Administration.”

This memo and its stifling effects, as well as the fact that it violated the Texas Education Code, were brought to the attention of several trustees.  Therefore the revision to DGB (local) was brought forward for a vote by the trustees to be added to the policy in order to protect the free speech rights of DISD employees:

 “As such, no rules, regulations, and agreements shall be made to require employees to report their consultation with trustees.”

This would bring the policy in line with the law in Texas, contained in the Texas Education Code, Section 11.1513 (j), which states:

(j) The employment policy may not restrict the ability of a school district employee to communicate directly with a member of the board of trustees regarding a matter relating to the operation of the district, except that the policy may prohibit ex parte communication relating to:

(1)  a hearing under Subchapter E or F, Chapter 21; and

(2) another appeal or hearing in which ex parte communication would be inappropriate pending a final decision by a school district board of trustees.

Trustee Morath initially sought to add an amendment which would have required that an employee report the conversation if the trustee “asked them to do anything.”  The other trustees correctly realized that this language was too vague.  In addition, this section dealt with employee policies, not trustee behavior which is covered elsewhere in DISD policy.

His amendment was voted down, 6-3 with only Nancy Bingham and Adam Medrano supporting it.

When the main motion was brought for the vote, Trustee Mike Morath cast the solitary “no” vote.  Nancy Bingham abstained rather than go on record as voting against the provisions in the Texas Education Code and against the First Amendment rights of employees.

So much for all the flowery flattery aimed toward the teachers from Trustee Morath at the beginning of the meeting.  Teachers, Mike Morath is NOT your friend.  He is NOT the friend of liberty and justice and the American way, either.  His actions speak louder than his words.  Mike Morath has just become the poster boy to illustrate the meaning of “speaking with a forked tongue”:  intent to mislead or deceive.  In other words, saying one thing and doing quite another.

Thanking teachers on the one hand and slapping a muzzle on them with the other?  Save your breath, Trustee Morath. Teachers don’t need that kind of gratitude.

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Posted in Giving Grades, Rotten in Denmark
124 comments
Advocate for Teachers
Advocate for Teachers

Since there are no uncertified “Open Mike” session scheduled for this school year, all should focus on school board meetings especially if you plan to return next year.

May 9, 2013 - Board Briefing 11:30 a.m. Board Room

May 23, 2013 - Board Meeting 5:30 p.m. Ada Williams Auditorium

************************************************************* 

School Board Election Saturday, May 11, 2013

The candidates are:

  • Rafael Narvaez III for District 7
  • Linda Wilkerson-Wynn, for District 5

  • Luis Hernandez for District 4

Persona non grata
Persona non grata

"What happened to my TFA? | Gary Rubinstein's Blog"

"Over the years I’ve seen TFA stray from the initial goal to fill voids where they were desperately needed. TFA has always been good at PR. As a struggling non-profit in the mid-90s they were wise to spotlight the success stories. This included successes of individual teachers and then of schools that were run by TFA alumni, generally charter schools.

But I’ve seen more recently what started as PR and taking care of the organizations self-interests turn into something that I honestly believe is dangerous.

By exaggerating their success, they have gotten the public to believe that kids would be a lot better off if we got rid of all the old lazy teachers and replaced them with these TFA dynamos — not admitting that most TFA corps members are not very effective, especially in their first year."

http://garyrubinstein.teachforus.org/2011/05/21/what-happened-to-my-tfa/

Persona non grata
Persona non grata

"Big expansion, big questions for Teach for America"

"A Harvard study of students in Texas found that a teacher's level of education, experience, and scores on licensing exams have a greater influence on student performance than any other factor. North Carolina research on teacher training programs, including Teach for America, showed that elementary students taught math by a first-year teacher lose the equivalent of 21 days of schooling compared with students who had teachers with four years of experience.

If inexperienced teachers don't perform as well, then why pair them with students who struggle the most?"

http://www.cbs8.com/story/16129683/big-expansion-big-questions-for-teach-for-america

Persona non grata
Persona non grata

"V for Victory: Teach For America, ELLs, and California"

"So what happened? Is California going to allow TFAers to continue teaching ELLs with only 2-3 days of summer “training”? There was good news recently from California for ELL students and their parents."

"Under the new regulations, interns, the Commission, school districts and intern programs will have to meet the following requirements:

Every intern program approved by the CTC must have a memorandum of understanding between the program administrators and the school district outlining the responsibilities of each, such as who provides supervision and support in the classroom;

Interns must receive 144 hours of support during the school year, with a minimum of two hours per week, in course planning, coaching within the classroom and problem solving;

Districts must also provide an additional 45 hours per year of support, mentoring and coaching specifically focused on teaching English learners from a mentor teacher who has an English learner authorization;

The Commission will establish minimum levels of content and expectations for what interns need to learn during their 120 hours of pre-service training, before they begin the formal intern program;

Districts will have to submit biennial reports to the CTC containing the number of interns they have and what type of supervision and support they’re receiving.

V is for one Victory for the Vulnerable."

http://cloakinginequity.com/2013/04/22/v-for-victory-teach-for-america-ells-and-california/

Persona non grata
Persona non grata

"Reconsidering TFA"

"California wants better training for English Language Learner teachers; TFA says No"

Update on 04/21/13 from EdSource: “The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing will now require non-credentialed Teach For America teachers and other intern teachers to receive more training in how to teach English learners and to get weekly on-the-job mentoring and supervision.” Their vote was unanimous."

http://reconsideringtfa.wordpress.com/2013/04/13/california-wants-better-training-for-english-language-learners-tfa-says-no/

Persona non grata
Persona non grata

"Will TFA Be Able to Meet California’s High Standards?"

"The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing has raised the standards for those who teach English language learners. No one get will uncertified interns be allowed to teach these students who need well-prepared teachers.

This is a problem for Teach for America because California has a huge number of ELLs.

Will TFA fight the higher standards or will they make sure their corps members are better prepared?"

http://dianeravitch.net/2013/04/19/will-tfa-be-able-to-meet-californias-high-standards/

Persona non grata
Persona non grata

"Battle for California: TFA Civil War, ELLs, and Teacher Quality"

"There is an update on the TFA civil war from California…I received the following letter via email from a source within the TFA alum circle. TFA alumni are organizing for teacher quality in the Golden State. TFA wants to be able continue to assign a revolving door of poorly trained (only 5 weeks in the summer) and uncertified teachers to instruct ELL students. The TFA alumni are standing up against the national organization, Michelle Rhee, DFER, and others and saying no. Bravo!! (See CI’s full TFA thread here). Draft of letter to TFA alums about California Commission on Teacher Credentialing decision below:"

http://cloakinginequity.com/2013/03/05/battle-for-california-tfa-civil-war-ells-and-teacher-quality/

Vendetta
Vendetta

If there are such rewards awaiting teachers wouldn't he want some of those rewards?

It's funny that most people who say teachers do the most important work aren't teachers and never have been and don't care to be teachers.

retiredteacher
retiredteacher

Interesting but not surprising that Morath has been offered coaching but refused. His ego

is gargantuan.

GodBlessTexas
GodBlessTexas

I have no doubt that Assessment 2.0 will help educators drive the development of a richer curriculum at the state, district, and local level, differentiated instruction tailored to individual student needs, and multiple opportunities during the school year to assess student learning. Arne Duncan

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2013/05/01/duncan-on-testing-we-cant-throw-the-baby-out-with-the-bathwater/?wprss=rss_education&tid=pp_widget

Arne’s speech today was mainly about Arne, as usual. The same as Miles’ speeches are always really about Miles.

Too bad we have someone in charge of national policy who thinks assessment drives curriculum. This is the whole problem with NCLB. Assessment is driving the curriculum into the ground.

We bet every real teacher and education professor in the United States would argue that assessment is driven by the curriculum, not the other way around.

Assessment is the tail wagging the dog because of idiots like Arne Duncan.

Arne has never taught.

Arne is a fraud, and so is Mike Miles, his groupie.

Thank God we do not have to salute to the Common Core. Thank goodness we have the right as Texans to make decisions about our curriculum and assessment at the state level.

Disrupted DISD
Disrupted DISD

The press release today was by CAPE, which describes itself as "a network of stakeholders who have a vested interest in or are involved in some way with Dallas ISD students and/or staff. The CAPE includes registered volunteers, faith-based organizations, community partners, government and community leaders, civic groups, involved parents and family members."  

Before basing too much on this data, for the positive or negative, there are several questions which need to be answered:

1)  Was the passing bar set the same as last year?  For example, for Science, if last year the student had to answer 5 of 10 questions correctly, was it 5 out of 10 again this year? 

I was at a talk given by Todd Williams on testing data, and he stated that one election year, scores "magically" went up, and it turned out that the passing bar was set lower.  That was the first time I had heard of that, but now I know to ask that question.

2)  Are the tests standardized to each other each year?  An ACT score of 24 in 2010 is comparable to a score of 24 in 2013, although the test itself is different each time it is given.  Are the STAAR and EOC tests standardized  in the same way?  So are we able to truly compare scores this year to the scores last year?  Was the test harder one year than another? 

I don't know who has the answers to these questions, but one cannot correctly interpret this data without knowing the answers to them.

Straight Talk
Straight Talk

Press release today; just think of how strong academic achievement will be when EVERY school leader and EVERY teacher believes ALL of our children can learn, is well trained and well supported, and is actively reaching out to parents to engage them in their child's success.

Preliminary STAAR Results Show Best Gains Ever

Dallas ISD students posted the best gains ever for the first administration of the eighth-grade State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness in reading and mathematics compared to any of the state tests administered between 2003 and 2011.

According to results released by the Texas Education Agency last week, Dallas ISD student achievement grew in seven out of eight categories, including 6 and 10 percentage point gains on the eighth-grade STAAR in reading and mathematics respectively. These increases reflect the hard work of our teachers and principals to raise expectations for student achievement and the quality of instruction.

Dallas ISD is proud that initial results show our students matched or outpaced state progress in seven out of eight categories. One category shows Dallas ISD eighth-grade students outpacing the state progress on the mathematics test by 9 percentage points. Dallas ISD is especially proud of our English language learners (ELL), who outscored the state average in fifth-grade reading (15 percentage points), eighth-grade reading (13 percentage points), and fifth-grade math (2 percentage points), while matching the eighth-grade math state average.

These results are encouraging; however, there is considerable work to do in all areas. Fifth-grade math scores dipped slightly, matching the state’s decline. Dallas ISD will continue to move forward in growing leadership capacity and teaching quality to provide all students with the best possible education.

retiredteacher
retiredteacher

Here's an article worth reading and discussing:

No Rich Child Left Behind

www.opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com

Pancho Villa
Pancho Villa

I love Californios and their STUPIDITIES. One come to mind, 1998 prop. 227; enjoy Californios! AHH! It feels so good. I hope our Tejanos in the Texas Houses of Representatives have learned from the Californios' lesson. Jajajaja.

Pancho Villa
Pancho Villa

Jajaja! Viva California and Prop 227. "hijole! Que chin a sus madres"

retiredteacher
retiredteacher

Vendetta, Those remarks about teahing beiing so great are a ruse. Morath doesn't respect teachers; we don't earn enough money to command respect. And he is helping to lower what we do make.

disgruntled
disgruntled

@Disrupted DISD I have the conversion table somewhere and will upload it when I find it.  I think this year's standard's are the same as last year's, but we're moving into Phase II next year, and the percent correct for passing will increase.

E Kim Selim
E Kim Selim

I remember that election year. They still published the tests back then. The math items took advantage of the fact that very poor performers added all the numbers no matter what the item said. At one grade level 13 items went like this.

Blah blah blah 11 blah blah 29 blah blah blah. The choices were 10 20 30 40.

Pearson printed the STAAR tests before the Commissioner stated he will release the test. This could be interesting.

 Rear View Mirror
Rear View Mirror

@Straight Talk Scores go up! Yes, especially if all you want is 44 specific skills taught in 185  8 hour days in school. Let me know if the remedial rate for college, or the freshman dropout rate decreases. Miles wants test scores, not educating children.

GodBlessTexas
GodBlessTexas

@Straight Talk 

We'll wait and see the ITBS tests in 8th and 5th grades and see if learning on a valid instrument measures these gains.

Folks like you who follow the state accountability tests don't understand you might as well watch a cow piss on a rock or read tea leaves as to make a big deal out of Pearson tests.

So far, their track record is perfect. A perfect lack of correlation to anything of any importance.

Disrupted DISD
Disrupted DISD

@Straight Talk 

Before basing too much on this data, for the positive or negative, there are several questions which need to be answered:

1)  Was the passing bar set the same as last year?  For example, for Science, if last year the student had to answer 5 of 10 questions correctly, was it 5 out of 10 again this year? 

I was at a talk given by Todd Williams on testing data, and he stated that one election year, scores "magically" went up, and it turned out that the passing bar was set lower.  That was the first time I had heard of that, but now I know to ask that question.

2)  Are the tests standardized to each other each year?  An ACT score of 24 in 2010 is comparable to a score of 24 in 2013, although the test itself is different each time it is given.  Are the STAAR and EOC tests standardized  in the same way?  So are we able to truly compare scores this year to the scores last year?  Was the test harder one year than another? 

I don't know who has the answers to these questions, but one cannot correctly interpret this data without knowing the answers to them.

DISD Teach
DISD Teach

@Straight Talk Well, if we're all so darn good at teaching to get these results, then where are all these so called bad teachers and principals?  Why do so many have to be put on growth plans or non-renewed if we attain these lofty achievements?  Or, did the old tenured bunch fall flat and the amazing scores of the TFA hires pull everyone up?  Must have been, because FMM couldn't rightfully fire the teachers responsible for such high praise to the district.

Pancho Villa
Pancho Villa

@Straight Talk  "Dallas ISD is especially proud of our English language learners (ELL)" So! Spanish or English?

"who outscored the state average in fifth-grade reading (15 percentage points), "  Just tell it like is it! Spanish or English?

A is for Abigail
A is for Abigail

@Straight Talk The backlash and opt out movements across the country related to testing have scared the testing companies like Pearson.  They made the tests easier.  

Scores also go "up" in election years.

Nobody believes your pathetic attempt to spin.

How come the Roosevelt principal is still on the payroll?  Why is Glover ditching DISD after less than a year?  What's going on that all of these people around Miles quit?

Those are the questions that matter: the questions about corruption and nepotism and waste of taxpayer money.

Also, how much of a bonus is Miles wanting to shake out of taxpayers?

Michael MacNaughton
Michael MacNaughton

@retiredteacher 

"The academic gap is widening because rich students are increasingly entering kindergarten much better prepared to succeed in school than middle-class students. This difference in preparation persists through elementary and high school."

Which is why the trustees were so adamant about getting an all day PreK off the ground last year. Now, if DISD would only disburse Title I funds to those kids who lack the most resources we could see long-term gains.  Equal is not the same as equitable.

Persona non grata
Persona non grata

In some other countries, they choose far fewer objectives and teach them DEEPLY! We, on the other hand, prefer a curriculum that is a mile wide and an inch deep. "Expose" the kids to a thousand objectives...

Pancho Villa
Pancho Villa

@GodBlessTexas if you are a parent, I will let you slide. You do not know better, that is not your job. However, if you are a teacher, a general Ed., teacher I will chew you and then I will spit you in the toilet for not knowing your business at all. I know you are not one of my ESL sisters, even they know better. Then, we have brainless General Ed teachers talking about ELL, ESL students when they are so clueless. OMFG! No wonder Middle School and High School are so screwed up. These FART’s for brain want to blain Elementary School Teachers. Here is your Homework, Why we give Middle School students ITBS? What kind of students get ITBS?

E Kim Selim
E Kim Selim

Agree. The variation among feeders suggests a teacher effect and not an easier test.

Disd parent
Disd parent

Where did you hear Glover is leaving?

GodBlessTexas
GodBlessTexas

@Michael MacNaughton @retiredteacher 

Research also indicates brain plasticity of an arc continuing into a young adult's life. Brain science here at UTD has shown huge gains at the middle school level when appropriate interventions are used.

Alan King and the rest who robbed our secondary schools to pay for prek need to understand the huge harm in robbing secondary campuses to create slush funds to be mismanaged by Miles.

Hope the feds get to the bottom of the disappearing teachers puzzle and the misuse of federal funds to feed a cash machine.

Woodrow Alum
Woodrow Alum

@E Kim Selim It's very cold there in the winter and dark.  Nothing else to do but study!!

They don't need to have standardized tests to prove achievement.


E Kim Selim
E Kim Selim

According to the article, the Finns were last in achievement in Europe but changed things around and now expect teachers to earn a masters, teaching problem solving and critical thinking, put teachers on same respect level as doctors and lawyers, do not buy into the testing paradigm and focus on more free time for student to synthesize what they learn.

The reason we cannot compare them is that they are a homogeneous society of white racists with no language barriers. Sounds like Highland Park to me.

I do not get it. Why would we not expect these practices for some and not others. Aren't we perpetuating myths. OMG I am more liberal than Persona non grata! Where is the death squad?

Persona non grata
Persona non grata

Speaking of cashing in...

Pearson should expand into other measurement devices! Imagine the possibilities!

Scales: tell us the weights you want!

Rulers: tell us how long you want an inch to be!

Thermometers: tell us what a degree is.

A is for Abigail
A is for Abigail

@Persona non grata I like the mile-wide, inch-deep curriculum, but tests like the STAAR tests expect the kids to have a mile-deep grasp of all of those objectives.

Everyone is set up for failure while the edu-reformers are set up to cash in.

E Kim Selim
E Kim Selim

The top nation, Finland, has no standardized tests or high stakes testing.

E Kim Selim
E Kim Selim

After_idem

I like what you are saying as you are being so kid focused. We should leave second language acquisition decisions to the language acquisition experts, not politicians or testing experts. According to the new LPAC manual exiting based on reading is English language STAAR only. Begs the question of how students could meet this criteria before the standards were released this January and if the passing standard will be a moving target or is it the recommended passing standard? The state just says Satisfactory on STAAR.

alter_idem
alter_idem

Absolutely right, Panchito, genes teachers are clueless. Why? Because the district under Miles & Morath,:-) as much as ever, doesn't place a premium on helping Hispanic students to learn either language well. The district sure doesn't educate the general ed teachers as to why these children have such terrible English by the time they hit middle school. Sheltered? For the uninitiated that means more administrative hassle for the teacher so she can afford to pay even less real attention to the sheltered student, who sits in a class with native English speakers, often without enough vocabulary to stay afloat.

alter_idem
alter_idem

I see students who have tested in Spanish through grade 5 show LEP Exit dates. How can that be? ITBS shows bilingual end kids coming in YEARS below grade level, and we would benefit from blanket administration of the ITBS- give us something meaningful to analyze for a change. As it is the smart ones who have access are using gates-mcginitie, Sci learn Reading Progress Indicator, etc. To get a better read. In other words, Pearson fans, real teachers know they can't rely on the tests for a true picture of where a student stands on the important things.

disgruntled
disgruntled

@E Kim Selim Parents have the option for their child not to receive services once their child is identified as a LEP student.  For a child enrolled from PK-4, there are no exits from the program.  From then on, the decision to exit a student is based upon the decision of the LPAC.  That decision relies, in part, on the student's TELPAS, WMLS, and STAAR scores.  

If you have access to Curriculum Central, the LPAC manual can be found under Resources>MLEP>Standards and Policies (Section 5).  The requirements for the exiting process are on page 87 (page 136 of the PDF) LPAC Manual.

E Kim Selim
E Kim Selim

I am not familiar with new requirements. It used to be the 40th percentile but I understand things have changed. Someone told me everyone stays through elementary school. No exemptions. Is that true? What about parents who want to opt out? Can someone tell me the new rules at elementary school?

retiredteacher
retiredteacher

Redistep is for 8th graders only. It is a predictor of PSAT and SAT scores. I'm sure that one will be added, as we don't give nearly enough tests in DISD.

E Kim Selim
E Kim Selim

@A is for Abigail @E Kim Selim 

The test could be easier for your students because you are a great teacher.  It is difficult to distinguish gains due to teaching or an easier test unless the test is blatantly easier.  Some feeders had scores go down.  It could be that the test is easier and these feeders blew it, but I would like to give credit to the teachers in the feeder patterns where the scores rose. We are only talking about gains.  The results last year were so low that even with these gains, the students are still far behind, but it is a start.

No firing decision should be based on any test results unless the teacher cheated.  I think the whole testing and accountability system is the root cause of the low performance.  We teach low level skills amenable to a multiple choice item and skip the higher order non-tested TEKS because they are not on the test. 

A is for Abigail
A is for Abigail

@E Kim Selim My kids are saying the tests were easier.  So if scores are up, then no teachers or principals should be fired, right?  But when scores are down, teachers should be fired?

NotTrueAtAll
NotTrueAtAll

@alter_idem 

Not true if resources are front loaded into preK while loading up secondary classes with either 45 students each or no teacher at all.

Morath believes our high school students are so far behind, they are toast.

Learning can occur across the span of a lifetime. There are millions of dropouts who attended HeadStart and other intervention programs and lost any benefit before finishing school.

The research does not indicate any benefit unless the program is highly funded with certified teachers, and even then, lousy schools will destroy any early benefits.

The "early, deep intervention" researchers don't have the research base to prove their point. In fact, the research indicates exactly the opposite--early benefits disappear by third grade.

Following Obama's policies, TFA should have saved American schools, crappy charter schools are given $30 milllion grants, and Roosevelt should have risen like a phoenix.

None of Obama's policies have any validity, including test more, learn more.

Miles is a true believer because he wants his pockets lined with bonus money.


alter_idem
alter_idem

Brain Health's model is nice and pretty and their research looks lovely but their method requires very tightly controlled delivery of training, and reports on measurable brain changes and high-stakes test scores.

Maybe we should teach kids to meditate and compare. The UTD project does not touch the years of wasted learning opportunities and losses overall in knowledge and comprehension that can only be acquired through exposure, experience and practice. Michael MacNaughton is right - need early, deep intervention.

Michael MacNaughton
Michael MacNaughton

@GodBlessTexas 

Correlation does not imply causation.

Although secondary schools took a hit, the creation of the all day preK program was not the cause.  In a $1.3 billion dollar yearly budget many deep cuts were made and schools were closed.  The budget commission voted every time to save teaching jobs where and when possible - the administration wanted to cut deeper than the final budget indicates.  We on the commission even made choices that were not financially the wisest yet were more compassionate and emotional including keeping the custodial program in-house rather than outsourced.  Blame the state for under-funding the district and, if you wanted a voice in the process, you were, and are, welcome at the monthly meetings to provide input. So far, in three years, I can count on one had the number of citizens who attend the meetings.

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Foundation for Empowerment (FCE) released 3 papers:

1. Disruptive Change: Mike Miles and the Crisis In Dallas ISD, which has been prepared with consultation by education academics, extensive research, review of data and education literature, and meetings and interviews with people of Dallas holding varying and sometimes conflicting points of view;

2. Digging Into Data and Evidence: Mike Miles, Dallas ISD, and Trickle-Down Education Report, by Dr. Julian Vasquez Helig, Lindsay Redd, M.A. and Dr. Ruth Vail; and

3. The Challenge of Disruptive Leadership in Dallas ISD, by Decoteau J. Irby, Ph.D. and Matthew Birkhold, M.A.

"You will see from these papers that, after much research and discussion, we believe the current Superintendent lacks the pedagogical, leadership and integrity qualities necessary to lead Dallas ISD and recommend the Board terminate his contract."

Citizens wanting to speak at regular board meetings and briefings must sign up by calling Board Services at (972) 925-3720 no later than 5 p.m. on the day before the meeting.

Contact the Superintendent and Trustees:
3700 Ross Avenue, Box 1
Dallas, TX 75204

Superintendent Mike Miles
milesfm@dallasisd.org

Lew Blackburn, 1st Vice President
District 5
Term Expires 2016
lblackburn@dallasisd.org
(972) 925-3718
Oak Lawn, West Dallas, Wilmer, Hutchins and portions of East Oak Cliff

Miguel Solis, Board President
District 8
Term Expires 2014
miguelsolis@dallasisd.org
(972) 925-3721
Love Field, Northwest Dallas, and Central Dallas

Eric Cowan
District 7
Term Expires 2016
ecowan@dallasisd.org
(972) 925-3721
North Central Oak Cliff and parts of West Dallas

Nancy Bingham
District 4
Term Expires 2016
nbingham@dallasisd.org
(972) 925-3722
Southeast Dallas, Seagoville, Balch Springs

Elizabeth Jones, 2nd Vice President
District 1
Term Expires 2015
elizabethjones@dallasisd.org
(972) 925-3722
Northwest Dallas, including North Dallas, Addison, parts of Carrollton and Farmers Branch

Mike Morath
District 2
Term Expires 2014
mmorath@dallasisd.org
(972) 925-3721
North and Near East Dallas

Dan Micciche, Board Secretary
District 3
Term Expires 2015
danmicciche@dallasisd.org
(972) 925-3722
Northeast Dallas

Joyce Foreman
District 6
Term Expires 2017
email coming
(972) 925-3722
Southwest Dallas

Bernadette Nutall
District 9
Term Expires 2015
benutall@dallasisd.org
(972) 925-3721
South Dallas and parts of Downtown Dallas, Pleasant Grove, Deep Ellum, Uptown, and East Dallas

"Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people in order to betray them." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833